Scrum Agile Project Management

Are Your User Stories Ready to Be Done?

April 1, 2014 0

The definition of “Done” (DoD), which means that a feature is ready for delivery, is a concept often discussed in Scrum. In this blog post, George Dinwiddie discusses the concept of “Ready” that apply to user stories that are ready to be developed.

Using Job Stories Instead of User Stories

March 11, 2014 0

User stories and their format defined by Mike Cohn “As a , I want so that .” are a classical way to record requirements in Scrum project. In his blog post, Alan Klement discusses a new format that he called “Job Stories” with the format “When … , I want to … , so I can … .”

Better Predictability with Smaller User Stories

February 24, 2014 0

User stories and their size are often the basis for planning a Sprint in Scrum. You can use a relative estimation and planning poker or a more classical approach to define the effort for each user stories. As such, they are also the basis for the metrics of progress and the velocity of the Scrum team.

Roles In Scrum Are Not Only For Team Members

February 3, 2014 1

Agile practitioners are aware that Scrum has three roles: developer, ScrumMaster and product owner. In his book “Executable Specifications with Scrum”, Mario Cardinal also discusses how you can use the role notion in Agile to better understand stakeholders that have a different perspective, a concept that is also named “personas”.

Agile Planning with User Stories

January 30, 2014 0

If Agile approaches are tools that allows to deal with uncertainty and change, they have often little impact on the management mindset that still requires to have deadlines proposed with software development projects. In this blog post George Dinwiddie discusses the usage of user stories for planning in Scrum projects.

User Stories Considered Harmful

January 7, 2014 0

Agile approaches have few proposed specific rules or techniques that have become de facto standards. One of these technique is to use the “as a <type of user>, I want to <do something>, so that <reason>” format to define requirements as user stories. In this blog post, Jim Bird discusses the idea that this user stories format is not the best way to manage requirements.

Practical Backlog Prioritization in Scrum

October 10, 2013 1

The prioritized product backlog is core to being Agile. A well prioritized backlog allows us to satisfy the customer through early and continuous delivery of valuable software at then end of each sprint in Scrum. Lean and Kanban may call it something else, but there too, prioritized work is key.

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